Celebration Time

Yes, the new school year has begun.  I’ve already attended two of my three classes and found a little cubby hole in the library.  To truly memorialize the occasion, I felt I should post my list of Top Five Favorite Historical Sites.  The selection is wickedly subjective.  I have visited most of them multiple times, and each represents a different reason why I enjoy history.  Starting with #5:

5.  Lincoln-Tallman House

I never became a huge Lincoln or Civil War person, but this house kickstarted my interest in history/historical sites.  As a wee lassie from the Midwest, this house was the most exotic building I had ever seen.  I haven’t visited in 30 years but am still grateful for its inspiration

4.  Tombstone’s Historama

Vincent Price narrates, while a metal diorama depicting the various historical eras in Tombstone rotates.  You have to see it to believe it.  Then enjoy some sarsaparilla.  Yes, you have to drive a bit to reach basically three streets.  You will thank me after you view the Historama.

3.  The JFK Library and Museum

Jackie was first class all the way and a devoted student of history.  Even if you aren’t particularly interested in the Kennedys, the library is a beautiful building; the exhibits are exquisitely displayed, and the ocean view is calming.  The library also contains the Hemingway archives for the literary fans in the crowd.

2.  Salem

From the Witch Museum to the House of Seven Gables to the Peabody & Essex Museum, I have spent months in Salem.  I dream of spending a week at the Hawthorne Hotel.  I love Finz restaurant, Colombo Yogurt, the historic homes, the graveyards.  Everything.  Standing in the garden of the House of Seven Gables is transporting.

1.  National Czech and Slovak Museum

I love my Czechs, especially when they are old and ornery.  The guide here made sure I revisited the first few artifacts on the tour that I missed because I arrived late.  The ticket gal said I should just join the tour.  She should have known better.  The more remarkable story is the recovery from the floor and upcoming re-opening of the museum.  The Czech, Iowa, and US governments all donated money to preserve the museum.  The Czechs were first and have been very generous with a number of US-based institutions.  The museum is located near the river (hence the flood) and is surrounded by Czech businesses.  If you like old time downtowns and ethnic enclaves, highlight Cedar Rapids on your map.

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