FLW in Reverse

While the Wright Walk was my first Wright adventure of the summer, beginning with the Oak Park Home and Studio is most appropriate.  For FLW fans, this summer has overflowed with new Wright experiences:  the Laurent House in Rockford, the Johnson Research Tower in Racine, and the Inside Wright’s Studio Tour with a visit to the studio balcony.  (Sorry, no pictures.  I didn’t pop for the indoor photo pass and forgot to take a few outside shots.)

Wright used his home to solidify his architectural beliefs:  revising, reshaping, and ultimately abandoning that home and office.  During this particular visit, I was again struck by Wright’s ability to design at all eye levels.  Regardless of your height or sitting/standing position, your eyes feasted on shapes, colors, and ingenuity.  An hour exploring each room would still be insufficient time.  Cherie, our guide, pointed out the smaller details that we otherwise might have missed, like the reversed gender roles in the Native American murals in the Wright’s bedroom.

The excitement of the tour was seeing the studio balcony, previously not open to the public.  The bird’s eye view of the studio floor was entertaining; the fireplace was the only unobstructed view.  (Oh, FLW, I love your commitment to your causes.)  The hidden treasure is the ability to see the roof lines of the other wings of the house.  His evolution from a pitched roof to a flat roof was visible.  Again, even looking out the windows at the roof, the small architectural details and the art glass caught your eye.

The balcony also contained three electronic panels with information about the architects who studied with Wright – a welcome addition to the interpretation.  Our group eagerly reviewed the panels and would have loved more biographies.  Once again, Alfonso Iannelli was ignored.  The circumstances of Wright’s departure from Oak Park were also sidestepped – a common criticism of the Trust’s interpretation.  Your eyes are so busy that your brain really isn’t processing audio, which would probably delight FLW.

Summer of Museums and Wright

Yes, I know.  It’s been forever.  I was busy with school and taking care of the Big Guy in his final days.  His determined spirit is an inspiration for us all.  

Preston Working for Treats

Now we press forward with some traveling and museum/historic site visits.  Over the next few months, you can look forward to trips to Columbus, OH, Tombstone, AZ, Racine, WI, Cedar Rapids, IA, St. Paul, MN, Rockford, IL, and Roscoe, IL.  Milwaukee, WI and Springfield, IL may also pop up.  Depends on the crazy level at work and the awesomeness level of the Chicago Bears.  

In the meantime, you can enjoy a sneak preview at my Pinterest board.

Celebration Time

Yes, the new school year has begun.  I’ve already attended two of my three classes and found a little cubby hole in the library.  To truly memorialize the occasion, I felt I should post my list of Top Five Favorite Historical Sites.  The selection is wickedly subjective.  I have visited most of them multiple times, and each represents a different reason why I enjoy history.  Starting with #5:

5.  Lincoln-Tallman House

I never became a huge Lincoln or Civil War person, but this house kickstarted my interest in history/historical sites.  As a wee lassie from the Midwest, this house was the most exotic building I had ever seen.  I haven’t visited in 30 years but am still grateful for its inspiration

4.  Tombstone’s Historama

Vincent Price narrates, while a metal diorama depicting the various historical eras in Tombstone rotates.  You have to see it to believe it.  Then enjoy some sarsaparilla.  Yes, you have to drive a bit to reach basically three streets.  You will thank me after you view the Historama.

3.  The JFK Library and Museum

Jackie was first class all the way and a devoted student of history.  Even if you aren’t particularly interested in the Kennedys, the library is a beautiful building; the exhibits are exquisitely displayed, and the ocean view is calming.  The library also contains the Hemingway archives for the literary fans in the crowd.

2.  Salem

From the Witch Museum to the House of Seven Gables to the Peabody & Essex Museum, I have spent months in Salem.  I dream of spending a week at the Hawthorne Hotel.  I love Finz restaurant, Colombo Yogurt, the historic homes, the graveyards.  Everything.  Standing in the garden of the House of Seven Gables is transporting.

1.  National Czech and Slovak Museum

I love my Czechs, especially when they are old and ornery.  The guide here made sure I revisited the first few artifacts on the tour that I missed because I arrived late.  The ticket gal said I should just join the tour.  She should have known better.  The more remarkable story is the recovery from the floor and upcoming re-opening of the museum.  The Czech, Iowa, and US governments all donated money to preserve the museum.  The Czechs were first and have been very generous with a number of US-based institutions.  The museum is located near the river (hence the flood) and is surrounded by Czech businesses.  If you like old time downtowns and ethnic enclaves, highlight Cedar Rapids on your map.